More Colleges Are Test-Optional

Three weeks ago, Fairtest announced that the number of test-optional colleges and universities has topped 1,000 institutions and now includes 300+ “top tier” schools.  The appeal of going test-optional has apparently ramped up in the past four years, with over 100 colleges jumping aboard the bandwagon in this time period.

A slew of articles followed the announcement, but The Conversation presented an excellent overview of the test-optional movement, its critics and proponents.  For years, critics contended that without standardized tests, colleges would be unable to attract high-achieving students.  Yet, just the opposite has occurred.  At Wake Forest, for example, “the average high school GPA of our incoming freshmen increased after we stopped using standardized test scores as a factor. Our students are better because we look at the whole person, not a test score.”

Grades are Key

Proponents insist that high school grades and overall academic performance are the best predictors of success in college.  High school transcripts are the most revealing portion of the application as they demonstrate grit, ability and accomplishment.  Standardized test scores say nothing about a student’s creativity, passions or community engagement. The article suggests that “nearly 70% of what matters to a young person’s college grades cannot be predicted by academic variables. College admission remains more art than science. Fairness and merit are best served in a holistic review than in a numeric cutoff.”

So the question becomes: should my teen even bother taking the SAT or ACT?  It is always worth taking an exam especially if a student prepares for it.  Let’s remember that while 1,000 schools may be test-optional, 3,500 colleges and universities do accept test scores.  Hence, applicants who plan to submit their scores will have more options.

Some Students Should Not Take a Test

That said, some students may simply be poor test takers regardless of how much they may prepare.  Others may be so anxious about a test that decides college entrance, they perform poorly.  And others may be strong students whose test scores don’t reflect their academic competencies.  From my perspective, each student must weigh the pros and cons and come to a decision he or she can live with. 

A student who is certain about not taking the SAT or ACT must also be realistic about how this decision will limit college options.  A student who is determined to at least try taking an exam can always decide later on whether or not to submit test scores.